Blog entries

  • Nous allons à FOSDEM 2016 et cfgmgmtcamp

    2016/01/18 by Arthur Lutz

    FOSDEM est le rendez-vous incontournable du logiciel libre en Europe. Logilab y participe depuis plusieurs années (en 2013 avec changeset evolution dans mercurial , puis en 2014 sur PostgreSQL, 2015 en tant que participants).

    https://www.logilab.org/file/3819974/raw/wide.png

    Cette année, nous allons donc participer à FOSDEM dans le track Configuration Management devroom, je presenterai Salt en mettant l'accent sur la supervision orchestrée par ce framework en collectant les données dans graphite et les exploitant dans grafana.

    Nous profitons d'être en Belgique pour enchaîner avec cfgmgmtcamp "Config Management Camp" qui se déroulera les jours suivants à Gent (1er et 2 février). J'y présenterai à peu près la même chose dans le cadre du Track "Salt". N'hésitez pas à jeter un coup d'œil à l'ensemble des présentations qui promettent d'être passionnantes.

    https://www.logilab.org/file/3819969/raw/cfgmngmentcamp.png

    Si vous allez à l'un de ces événements, faites-nous signe qu'on en profite pour se voir. Nous nous efforcerons de partager une partie de ce que nous aurons appris lors de nos pérégrinations dans un article de blog, donc "watch this space" et nos comptes twitter (@arthurlutz, @douardda, @logilab).


  • We went to FOSDEM 2016 (and cfgmgmtcamp)

    2016/02/09 by Arthur Lutz

    David & I went to FOSDEM and cfgmgmtcamp this year to see some conferences, do two presentations, and discuss with the members of the open source communities we contribute to.

    https://www.logilab.org/file/4253021/raw/16312670359_565eec1e3d_k.jpg

    At FOSDEM, we started early by doing a presentation at 9.00 am in the "Configuration Management devroom", which to our surprise was a large room which was almost full. The presentation was streamed over the Internet and should be available to view shortly.

    I presented "Once you've configured your infrastructure using salt, monitor it by re-using that definition". (mirrored on slideshare. The main part was a demo, the code being published on bitbucket.

    http://image.slidesharecdn.com/fosdem2016describeitmonitorit-160203131836/95/fosdem-2016-after-describing-your-infrastructure-as-code-reuse-that-to-monitor-it-1-638.jpg?cb=1454505792

    The presentation was streamed live (I came across someone that watched it on the Internet to "sleep in"), and should be available to watch when it gets encoded on http://video.fosdem.org/.

    FOSDEM video box

    We then saw the following talks :

    • Unified Framework for Big Data Foreign Data Wrappers (FDW) by Shivram Mani in the Postgresql Track
    • Mainflux Open Source IoT Cloud
    • EzBench, a tool to help you benchmark and bisect the Graphics Stack's performance
    • The RTC components in the debian infrastructure
    • CoreOS: A Linux distribution designed for application containers that scale
    • Using PostgreSQL for Bibliographic Data (since we've worked on http://data.bnf.fr/ with http://cubicweb.org/ and PostgreSQL)
    • The FOSDEM infrastructure review

    Congratulations to all the FOSDEM organisers, volunteers and speakers. We will hopefully be back for more.

    We then took the train to Gent where we spent two days learning and sharing about Configuration Management Systems and all the ecosystem around it (orchestration, containers, clouds, testing, etc.).

    More on our cfmgmtcamp experience in another blog post.

    Photos under creative commons CC-BY, by Ludovic Hirlimann and Deborah Bryant here and here


  • We went to cfgmgmtcamp 2016 (after FOSDEM)

    2016/02/09 by Arthur Lutz

    Following a day at FOSDEM (another post about it), we spend two days at cfgmgmtcamp in Gent. At cfgmgmtcamp, we obviously spent some time in the Salt track since it's our tool of choice as you might have noticed. But checking out how some of the other tools and communities are finding solutions to similar problems is also great.

    cfgmgmtcamp logo

    I presented Roll out active Supervision with Salt, Graphite and Grafana (mirrored on slideshare), you can find the code on bitbucket.

    http://image.slidesharecdn.com/cfgmgmtcamp2016activesupervisionwithsalt-160203131954/95/cfgmgmtcamp-2016-roll-out-active-supervision-with-salt-graphite-and-grafana-1-638.jpg?cb=1454505737

    We saw :

    Day 1

    • Mark Shuttleworth from Canonical presenting Juju and its ecosystem, software modelling. MASS (Metal As A Service) was demoed on the nice "OrangeBox". It promises to spin up an OpenStack infrastructure in 15 minutes. One of the interesting things with charms and bundles of charms is the interfaces that need to be established between different service bricks. In the salt community we have salt-formulas but they lack maturity in the sense that there's no possibility to plug in multiple formulas that interact with each other... yet.
    juju deploy of openstack
    • Mitch Michell from Hashicorp presented vault. Vault stores your secrets (certificates, passwords, etc.) and we will probably be trying it out in the near future. A lot of concepts in vault are really well thought out and resonate with some of the things we want to do and automate in our infrastructure. The use of Shamir Secret Sharing technique (also used in the debian infrastructure team) for the N-man challenge to unvault the secrets is quite nice. David is already looking into automating it with Salt and having GSSAPI (kerberos) authentication.
    https://www.vaultproject.io/assets/images/hero-95b4a434.png bikes!

    Day 2

    • Gareth Rushgrove from PuppetLabs talked about the importance of metadata in docker images and docker containers by explaining how these greatly benefit tools like dpkg and rpm and that the container community should be inspired by the amazing skills and experience that has been built by these package management communities (think of all the language-specific package managers that each reinvent the wheel one after the other).
    • Testing Immutable Infrastructure: we found some inspiration from test-kitchen and running the tests inside a docker container instead of vagrant virtual machine. We'll have to take a look at the SaltStack provisioner for test-kitchen. We already do some of that stuff in docker and OpenStack using salt-cloud. But maybe we can take it further with such tools (or testinfra whose author will be joining Logilab next month).
    coreos, rkt, kubernetes
    • How CoreOS is built, modified, and updated: From repo sync to Omaha by Brian "RedBeard" Harrington. Interesting presentation of the CoreOS system. Brian also revealed that CoreOS is now capable of using the TPM to enforce a signed OS, but also signed containers. Official CoreOS images shipped through Omaha are now signed with a root key that can be installed in the TPM of the host (ie. they didn't use a pre-installed Microsoft key), along with a modified TPM-aware version of GRUB. For now, the Omaha platform is not open source, so it may not be that easy to build one's own CoreOS images signed with a personal root key, but it is theoretically possible. Brian also said that he expect their Omaha server implementation to become open source some day.
    • The use of Salt in Foreman was presented and demoed by Stephen Benjamin. We'll have to retry using that tool with the newest features of the smart proxy.
    • Jonathan Boulle from CoreOS presented "rkt and Kubernetes: What’s new with Container Runtimes and Orchestration" In this last talk, Johnathan gave a tour of the rkt project and how it is used to build, coupled with kubernetes, a comprehensive, secure container running infrastructure (which uses saltstack!). He named the result "rktnetes". The idea is to use rkt as the kubelet's (primany node agent) container runtime of a kubernetes cluster powered by CoreOS. Along with the new CoreOS support for TPM-based trust chain, it allows to ensure completely secured executions, from the bootloader to the container! The possibility to run fully secured containers is one of the reasons why CoreOS developed the rkt project.
    coffee!

    We would like to thank the cfgmgmntcamp organisation team, it was a great conference, we highly recommend it. Thanks for the speaker event the night before the conference, and the social event on Monday evening. (and thanks for the chocolate!).