Following a day at FOSDEM (another post about it), we spend two days at cfgmgmtcamp in Gent. At cfgmgmtcamp, we obviously spent some time in the Salt track since it's our tool of choice as you might have noticed. But checking out how some of the other tools and communities are finding solutions to similar problems is also great.

cfgmgmtcamp logo

I presented Roll out active Supervision with Salt, Graphite and Grafana (mirrored on slideshare), you can find the code on bitbucket.

We saw :

Day 1

  • Mark Shuttleworth from Canonical presenting Juju and its ecosystem, software modelling. MASS (Metal As A Service) was demoed on the nice "OrangeBox". It promises to spin up an OpenStack infrastructure in 15 minutes. One of the interesting things with charms and bundles of charms is the interfaces that need to be established between different service bricks. In the salt community we have salt-formulas but they lack maturity in the sense that there's no possibility to plug in multiple formulas that interact with each other... yet.
juju deploy of openstack
  • Mitch Michell from Hashicorp presented vault. Vault stores your secrets (certificates, passwords, etc.) and we will probably be trying it out in the near future. A lot of concepts in vault are really well thought out and resonate with some of the things we want to do and automate in our infrastructure. The use of Shamir Secret Sharing technique (also used in the debian infrastructure team) for the N-man challenge to unvault the secrets is quite nice. David is already looking into automating it with Salt and having GSSAPI (kerberos) authentication. bikes!

Day 2

  • Gareth Rushgrove from PuppetLabs talked about the importance of metadata in docker images and docker containers by explaining how these greatly benefit tools like dpkg and rpm and that the container community should be inspired by the amazing skills and experience that has been built by these package management communities (think of all the language-specific package managers that each reinvent the wheel one after the other).
  • Testing Immutable Infrastructure: we found some inspiration from test-kitchen and running the tests inside a docker container instead of vagrant virtual machine. We'll have to take a look at the SaltStack provisioner for test-kitchen. We already do some of that stuff in docker and OpenStack using salt-cloud. But maybe we can take it further with such tools (or testinfra whose author will be joining Logilab next month).
coreos, rkt, kubernetes
  • How CoreOS is built, modified, and updated: From repo sync to Omaha by Brian "RedBeard" Harrington. Interesting presentation of the CoreOS system. Brian also revealed that CoreOS is now capable of using the TPM to enforce a signed OS, but also signed containers. Official CoreOS images shipped through Omaha are now signed with a root key that can be installed in the TPM of the host (ie. they didn't use a pre-installed Microsoft key), along with a modified TPM-aware version of GRUB. For now, the Omaha platform is not open source, so it may not be that easy to build one's own CoreOS images signed with a personal root key, but it is theoretically possible. Brian also said that he expect their Omaha server implementation to become open source some day.
  • The use of Salt in Foreman was presented and demoed by Stephen Benjamin. We'll have to retry using that tool with the newest features of the smart proxy.
  • Jonathan Boulle from CoreOS presented "rkt and Kubernetes: What’s new with Container Runtimes and Orchestration" In this last talk, Johnathan gave a tour of the rkt project and how it is used to build, coupled with kubernetes, a comprehensive, secure container running infrastructure (which uses saltstack!). He named the result "rktnetes". The idea is to use rkt as the kubelet's (primany node agent) container runtime of a kubernetes cluster powered by CoreOS. Along with the new CoreOS support for TPM-based trust chain, it allows to ensure completely secured executions, from the bootloader to the container! The possibility to run fully secured containers is one of the reasons why CoreOS developed the rkt project.

We would like to thank the cfgmgmntcamp organisation team, it was a great conference, we highly recommend it. Thanks for the speaker event the night before the conference, and the social event on Monday evening. (and thanks for the chocolate!).

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