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OSCON, Open Source CONvention, takes place every year and promotes Open Source for technology. It is one of the meeting hubs for the growing open source community. This was the occasion for us to learn about new projects and to present CubicWeb during a BAYPIGgies meeting hosted by OSCON.

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I had the chance to talk with some of the folks working at OpenLina where they presented LINA. LINA is a thin virtual layer that enables developers to write and compile code using ordinary Linux tools, then package that code into a single executable that runs on a variety of operating systems. LINA runs invisibly in the background, enabling the user to install and run LINAfied Linux applications as if they were native to that user's operating system. They were curious about CubicWeb and took as a challenge to package it with LINA... maybe soon on LINA's applications list.

Two open sources projects catched my attention as potential semantic data publishers. The first one is Family search where they provide a tool to search for family history and genealogy. Also they are working to define a standard format to exchange citation with Open Library. Democracy Lab provide an application to collect votes and build geographic statitics based on political interests. They will at some point publish data semantically so that their application data could be consumed.

It also was for us the occasion of introducing CubicWeb to the BayPIGgies folks. The same presentation as the one held at Europython 2009. I'd like to take the opportunity to answer a question I did not manage to answer at that time. The question was: how different is CubicWeb from Freebase Parallax in terms of interface and views filters? Before answering this question let's detail what Freebase Parallax is.

Freebase Parallax provides a new way to browse and explore data in Freebase. It allows to browse data from a set of data to a related set of data. This interface enables to aggregate visualization. For instance, given the set of US presidents, different types of views could be applied, such as a timeline view, where the user could set up which start and end date to use to draw the timeline. So generic views (which applies to any data) are customizable by the user.

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The search powered by Parallax is very similar to CubicWeb faceted search, except that Parallax provides the user with a list of suggested filters to add in addition to the default one, the user can even remove a filter. That is something we could think about for CubicWeb: provide a generated faceted search so that the user could decide which filters to choose.

Parallax also provides related topics to the current data set which ease navigation between sets of data. The main difference I could see with the view filter offered by Parallax and CubicWeb is that Parallax provides the same views to any type of data whereas CubicWeb has specific views depending on the data type and generic views that applies to any type of data. This is a nice Web interface to browse data and it could be a good source of inspiration for CubicWeb.

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During this talk, I mentionned that CubicWeb now understands SPARQL queries thanks to the fyzz parser.

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